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All 105 Ecuador Volcanoes: Active, Mainland, Galapagos (Charts/Map)

How many volcanoes are in Ecuador? You would think that would be a pretty straightforward question. But as I was doing my research I found that the answers were very different depending on which website I was looking at. The statistics provided in this article are from the Geophysical Institute (Spanish site) in Ecuador. They are the official authorities on Ecuador volcanoes.

There are 105 volcanoes in Ecuador. 84 volcanoes are on continental (mainland) Ecuador. There are an additional 21 volcanoes in the Galapagos Islands Archipeligo. These numbers were current at the time of writing. And this post will be updated if/when these numbers increase.

volcanoes in ecuador

The number of volcanoes may continue to grow. This is because of more exploration in the country. What looks like a mountain may turn out to be an extinct volcano. For example, 5 new volcanoes were discovered in 2009 (BBC news article in Spanish).

Ecuador Volcano Guide

In this article, we will cover the full list of all 105 volcanoes, including their name, altitude, and the date of their most recent eruption.

We’ll also discuss some common questions about volcanoes in Ecuador.

Time Epochs

Before you delve into the tables below, let’s quickly talk about time periods. Volcanoes were formed during different epochs of time.

Those from the Holocene period are the youngest, and most likely to be active.

However, some of the volcanoes from earlier time epochs may also still be active.

  • Holocene: 11,700 years ago to the present day
  • Pleistocene: 2.5 million to 11,700 years ago
  • Pliocene: 5.3 to 2.5 million years ago
  • Miocene: 23 to 5.3 million years ago

Active vs Dormant vs Extinct

We should also talk about the 3 different volcano statuses. These definitions vary depending on who you ask, as there is no real consensus among volcano experts.

  • Active: An active volcano may be in the process of erupting, or show other signs of unrest (such as degassing or seismic activity). Some experts include dormant volcanoes in this category.
  • Dormant: Not currently erupting (or showing other signs of unrest), but is likely to erupt at some point in the future. Some claim that for a volcano to be dormant, it must be inactive for at least 10,000 years. But for the purpose of this article, we’re saying a volcano is dormant if it is not currently active.
  • Extinct: Unlikey to erupt again as the volcano no longer has an active magma supply. Some volcanoes that are thought to be extinct may actuay be dormant.
antisana volcano ecuador
Antisana Volcano daytime photo

84 Volcanoes on Mainland Ecuador

Here are the names, altitude, status, and last eruption date for the 84 volcanoes on mainland Ecuador.

Below the chart, is a map showing the location of each of these volcanoes.

Ecuador Volcano NameAltitudeStatusLast Eruption
1Aliso13,976 feet (4260 meters)Dormant≈2450 BC
2Almas Santas12,287 feet (3745 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
3Altar17,451 feet (5319 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
4Angahuana13,533 feet (4125 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
5Antisana18,891 feet (5758 meters)Dormant1802
6Atacazo-Ninahuilca14,616 feet (4455 meters)Dormant≈320 BC
7Bermejo9,642 feet (2939 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
8Carcacha12,510 feet (3813 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
9Carihuairazo16,463 feet (5018 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
10Casitagua11,545 feet (3519 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
11Cerro Negro14,649 feet (4465 meters)Active (Restless)1936?
12Cerro Puntas14,928 feet (4550 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
13Chacana14,741 feet (4493 meters)Dormant1773
14Chachimbiro13,468 feet (4105 meters)Dormant3740 BC?
15Chalpatán11,890 feet (3624 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
16Chalupas13,825 feet (4214 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
17Chaquilulo11,972 feet (3649 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
18Chaupiloma13,766 feet (4196 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
19Chiles15,443 feet (4707 meters)Dormant1936?
20Chiltazón13,015 feet (3967 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
21Chimborazo20,564 feet (6268 meters)Dormant≈640
22Chinibano13,780 feet (4200 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
23Chulamez11,699 feet (3566 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
24Conos de Calpi10,548 feet (3215 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
25Conos de Licto10,945 feet (3336 meters)DormantSometime during the Pleistocene or Holocene Epoch
26Conos de Puyo3,517 feet (1072 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
27Corazón15,689 feet (4782 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
28Cosanga13,159 feet (4011 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
29Cotacachi16,220 feet (4944 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
30Cotopaxi19,347 feet (5897 meters)Dormant2015
31Coturco11,729 feet (3575 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
32Cubilche12,559 feet (3828 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
33Cuicocha11,079 feet (3377 meters)Potentially Active (seismic activity and gas emissions)950 BCE
34Cushnirumi12,388 feet (3776 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
35Cusin13,087 feet (3989 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
36Domos Huevos de Chivo12,139 feet (3700 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
37El Dorado9,137 feet (2785 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
38Fuya-Fuya14,039 feet (4279 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
39Guagua Pichincha15,669 feet (4776 meters)Potentially Active (seismic unrest)2004
40Horqueta12,139 feet (3700 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
41Huañuña13,947 feet (4251 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
42Huicutambo11,594 feet (3534 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
43Huisla12,346 feet (3763 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
44Igualata14,534 feet (4430 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
45Iguán12,717 feet (3876 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
46Ilaló10,459 feet (3188 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
47Iliniza Norte16,749 feet (5105 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
48Iliniza Sur17,208 feet (5245 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
49Imbabura15,161 feet (4621 meters)Dormant≈5550 BC
50Izambi14,291 feet (4356 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
51Machángara11,352 feet (3460 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
52Mangus12,940 feet (3944 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
53Mojanda13,983 feet (4263 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
54Mulmul12,723 feet (3878 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
55Nevado Cayambe18,996 feet (5790 meters)Dormant1786
56Pambamarca13,369 feet (4075 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
57Pan de Azúcar11,424 feet (3482 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
58Parulo10,827 feet (3300 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
59Pasochoa13,776 feet (4199 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
60Pilavo13,858 feet (4224 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
61Pilisurco14,790 feet (4508 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
62Potrerillos13,665 feet (4165 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
63Pululahua11,008 feet (3356 meters)Dormant467 BCE
64Pulumbura13,825 feet (4214 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
65Pumayacu6726 feet (2050 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
66Puñalica13,084 feet (3988 meters)DormantSometime during the Holocene Epoch
67Putzalagua11,522 feet (3512 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
68Quilindaña15,997 feet (4876 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
69Quilotoa12,844 feet (3915 meters)Dormant1797
70Reventador11,683 feet (3562 meters)Active2009-2021 (ongoing)
71Rucu Pichincha15,407 feet (4696 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
72Rumiñahui15,492 feet (4722 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
73Sagatoa13,678 feet (4169 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
74Sangay17,257 feet (5260 meters)Active2020
75Santa Cruz13,051 feet (3978 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
76Sincholagua15,988 feet (4873 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
77Soche12,972 feet (3955 meters)Dormant6650 BC?
78Sumaco12,244 feet (3732 meters)Dormant1933
79Tungurahua16,475 feet (5023 meters)Dormant2016
80Viejo Cayambe15,797 feet (4815 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
81Virgen Negra12,001 feet (3658 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
82Volcán Azul10,069 feet (3069 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
83Yanaurcu10,259 feet (3127 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
84Yanaurcu de Piñán14,879 feet (4535 meters)Extinctmore than 10,000 years ago
volcanoes in ecuador map
Tungurahua Volcano erupting. Long exposure photo shot at night.

Map of Every Ecuador Volcano

Here’s a map of all 84 registered volcanoes on continental Ecuador from the Instituto Geofisico.

  • Blue: Extinct or dormant volcanoes that last reupted more than 10,000 years ago.
  • Yellow: Potentially acitve volcanoes that last erupted less than 10,000 years ago.
  • Orange: Active volanoes that last erupted less than 500 years ago.
  • Red: Currently eruupting (this map was created in 2011)
  • Black: Main cities.
A28) Clasificación de los volcanes del Ecuador parte 1: en base a su  historia eruptiva - Volcanes del Ecuador

21 Galapagos Volcanoes

There are 21 emergent volcanoes in the Galapagos Islands. These are volcanoes that stick out above the surface of the water.

Interestingly, the Galapagos Islands were formed by volcanic activity, not by breaking off of another landmass.

There are also volcanoes below sea level, such as the Galapagos Rift which is at -7972 feet (-2430 meters). It last erupted in 1996.

galapagos volcanos
Shot at Volcan Chico, on Sierra Negra Volcano

Here is the complete (and accurate) list of all 21 emergent volcanoes in the Galapagos Islands. It includes altitude, status, and last known eruption date.

Galapagos Volcano NameAltitudeStatusLast Eruption
1Alcedo, Isabela Island3710 feet (1130 meters)Dormant1993
2Cerro Azul, Isabela Island5541 feet (1689 meters)Dormant2008
3Cerro Pajas, Floreana Island2099 feet (640 meters)ExtinctUnknown
4Darwin, Isabela Island4350 feet (1325 meters)DormantUnknown
5Darwin (Culpepper), Darwin Island541 feet (165 meters)ExtinctUnknown
6Ecuador, Isabela Island2590 feet (790 meters)Dormant1150
7Española, Española Island276 feet (276 meters)ExtinctUnknown
8Genovesa, Genovesa Island210 feet (64 meters)DormantUnknown
9La Cumbre, Fernandina Island4843 feet (1476 meters)Active2020
10Marchena, Marchena Island1125 feet (343 meters)Dormant1991
11Pinta, Pinta Island2559 feet (780 meters)Dormant1928
12Pinzon, Pinzon Island1503 feet (458 meters)ExtinctUnknown
13Rabida, Rabida Island1109 feet (338 meters)ExtinctUnknown
14Roca Redonda, Islet220 feet (67 meters)ExtinctUnknown
15San Cristóbal, San Cristóbal Island2490 feet (759 meters)ExtinctUnknown
16Santa Cruz Volcano (formed Santa Cruz Island, Balta Island, and North Seymour Island)2835 feet (864 meters)DormantUnknown
17Santa Fe, Santa Fe Island656 feet (200 meters)ExtinctUnknown
18Santiago, Santiago Island3018 feet (920 meters)Dormant1906
19Sierra Negra, Isabela Island3687 feet (1124 meters)Dormant2018
20Wolf, Isabela Island5610 feet (1710 meters)Active2022
21Wolf (Wenman), Wolf Island830 feet (253 meters)ExtinctUnknown

6 Common Questions About Volcanoes in Ecuador

1. How many volcanoes are in Ecuador?

There are 105 volcanoes in Ecuador. 84 are on the mainland, and 21 make up the Galapagos Islands.

The ones on the mainland belong to the Nothern Volcanic Zone of the Andes Mountains.

2. How many active volcanoes in Ecuador?

There are seven active volcanos in Ecuador, four on mainland Ecuador (Sangay, Tungurahua, Cotopaxi, Reventador) and three in the Galapagos Islands (La Cumbre, Sierra Negra, Wolf). These eight volcanoes have erupted in the past 10 years.

As stated earlier, some experts will only classify a volcano as being active if it is currently in some state of eruption or volcanic unrest.

Others include all dormant volcanoes in this category, as they are potentially active.

We’ll break it down into a few categories.

  • Erupted in the last 500 years: 12 on mainland Ecuador, 8 in Galapagos (includes those that erupted in the last 100 and 10 years)
  • Erupted in the last 100 years: 8 on mainland Ecuador, 7 in Galapagos (includes those that erupted in last 10 years)
  • Erupted in the last 10 years: 4 on mainland Ecuador, 3 in Galapagos
active volcanoes in ecuador

3. What is Avenue of the Volcanoes?

Running north-south along the Andes mountains, you’ll find Avenida de los Volcanes. In English, this means Volcano Avenue (or Avenue of the Volcanoes).

It was named by Alexander von Humbolt, a Prussian naturalist, and geologist in 1802.

How long is Avenida de los Volcanes? This scenic route runs approximately 236 miles (380 km) by car. Cayambe Volcano is just 143 miles (230 km) from Sangay Volcano.

Along Avenida de los Volcanes, you’ll find nine principal volcanos.

  1. Cayambe
  2. Antisana
  3. Los Illinizas
  4. Cotopaxi
  5. Quilotoa
  6. Tungurahua
  7. Chimborazo
  8. Altar
  9. Sangay

4. What is the highest volcano in Ecuador?

The highest volcano (and mountain) in Ecuador is Chimborazo. It is 20,564 feet (6268 meters) tall. The top of Chimborazo is completely covered in glaciers.

Chimborazo is categorized as a stratovolcano. It has not erupted in the last 1300-1600 years.

5. Which volcanoes are near Quito?

As shown in the map above, Quito is surrounded by eight volcanoes in relatively close proximity.

The measurements below are from the center of Quito to the summit of the volcano, not from the edge of the city to the edge of the volcano.

So while Quito actually borders the base of Rucu Pichincha, it is second on our list as the summit is slightly further than the summit of Ilaló.

  • Ilaló (Extinct) 6.3 miles, 10.1 kilometers, Southeast
  • Rucu Pichincha (Extinct) 6.8 miles, 11 kilometers, West
  • Guagua Pichincha (Potentially Active) 10.3 miles, 16.5 kilometers, West
  • Casitagua (Extinct) 10.5 miles, 17 kilometers, North
  • Coturco (Extinct) 12.4 miles, 20 kilometers, East
  • Carcacha (Extinct) 13.2 miles, 21.3 kilometers, Southwest
  • Atacazo-Ninahuilca (Potentially Active) 15.8 miles, 25.4 kilometers, Southwest
  • Pasochoa (Extinct) 17.8 miles, 28.6 kilometers, South

Take the cable car for the best view above Quito.

6. Can I hike up a volcano in Ecuador?

You absolutely can climb up a volcano in Ecuador, but there are a few things to keep in mind. The first should be a given, do not climb up a volcano that is actively erupting!

Another thing to keep in mind is what sort of hike you would like to do.

Snow Line: The snow-line in the Andes in Ecuador begins between 15,748 and 16,404 feet (4,800 and 5,000 meters). Anything above that is covered with snow and glaciers and will require specialized equipment.

Even Chimborazo, the tallest volcano in Ecuador can be climbed. But at that point, it is less hiking and more mountaineering. There are 2 huts along the climb. The climb is not without risks, as in 1993 10 climbers perished in an avalanche.

The hike to the summit of Quilotoa volcano has been labeled as the most popular trek in all of Ecuador, and for good reason. In the crater of this dormant volcano is a beautiful turquoise lagoon.

From Quilotoa town, the hike around the rim of the crater is around 4.7 miles (7.5 kilometers). It should be noted that due to the acidity of the water, and cooler mountain temperatures, swimming is not recommended.

Lots of the other volcanoes can be hiked as well. And don’t forget to explore the Galapagos Islands, as all the land there was created by volcanic activity.

Here is Bryan and Dena’s experience hiking Sierra Negra.

More reading: Summiting Antisana Volcano in Ecuador: What to Expect

volcano banos ecuador
City of Banos, Ecuador at the foot of Tungurahua Volcano

Your Turn:

Did you learn something new about the volcanoes in Ecuador? Have you ever had the opportunity to hike up a volcano in Ecuador? Which one was it? Please share your experience in the comments below.